Nick Delpopolo has a new website and soon, a new dojo

 

Q: You have made your first judo instructional video. It’s on yoko-tomoe-nage. Why this particular throw?
A:
I picked this throw as my debut video because it can be applied to both Judo and BJJ equally. I work with a lot of BJJ athletes and they like yoko-tomoe-nage because it’s a safe attack that brings them to the ground. It’s also great for BJJ because they generally start with a bent-over stance which is what you need to make the throw work.

Q: There are many judo video platforms out there, which carry many titles from various players. Why did you decide to go on your own and start your own website rather than sell through established platforms?
A:
One of my favorite sayings is “The tide rises all boats”. There are a lot of instructional platforms out there but only one big one that I know of specifically for judo, and the more platforms there are, the more opportunities judokas will have to enjoy success in this market. Rather than have a monopoly, there should be many options and outlets available for Olympic judokas.

Q: Your yoko-tomoe-nage video is parked under the website BigJudo.com. How did you come up with the name Big Judo?
A:
Throughout my career, especially during my prime, I’ve always been a crowd favorite. It’s no secret that’s because of my “BIG JUDO” style. I had the ability to throw anyone in the world with a wide variety of techniques that draw gasps and applause from the crowd. Whenever anyone speaks about my prospects in a tournament, they say will say something like: “On a good day, Delpopolo can throw anyone.” I feel that as a country (USA) we overlook the importance of being able to throw big and smash opponents to the mat with a wide range of techniques. There’s too much emphasis on how to maintain a lead and thwart attacks when you’re ahead. Of course such tactics are important but as a judoka you’ve got to know how to throw for ippon as well.

Q: Will there be more technical videos to come?
A:
Absolutely. I’ve already begun filming my second video. In the coming weeks and months you can expect other Olympic and World-caliber athletes debut their videos on BigJudo.com. With a website name like that, of course the focus will big throwers.  

Q: Why did you wait this long to do a judo instructional video?
A:
I have not announced this publicly yet, so JudoCrazy will be the first to know, but I am opening my own dojo in the next few weeks. This has been a lifelong goal of my wife, Carrie Chandler, and mine. She is a former Pan-American Champion and a Top 10 player in the IJF World Ranking list. And I’m on my 17th year as a member of the USA National Team. A few years ago, we started an after-school program at Fort Worth Judo Club in Texas, to make ends meet while I was focusing on my competition career. We offer an alternative to after-school day-care for working parents. We pick up the kids at school, bring them to the dojo have a snack, do their homework and do about 90 minutes of judo and physical training, five days a week. Despite the Covid-19 pandemic, our program grew very quickly that we soon outgrew our space. We needed to open our own place. That quickly brought the business end of judo to the forefront and it seems like it’s the perfect timing to launch my instructional website.

Q: What would you say is special about your videos and how will they be different from the many other instructional videos out there?
A:
As I said, I am a big thrower so the focus of my teaching is on how to become a big thrower. I break up my videos into small segments so you can master each section before moving to the next. We use multiple angles and overhead shots, text and graphic prompts and pause the video when it’s the best time for you to try on your own. I also provide a video review of myself analyzing the techniques on screen where I can stop and emphasize points while not being upside down or in the middle of the throw to do so. I’ve not seen this approach being done elsewhere, and I think it’s a pretty effective way to teach.

Read our review of Nick Delpopolo’s yoko-tomoe-nage instructional video.